Unboxing: October’s Monster themed Wildest Dreams book box.

Unboxing: October’s Monster themed Wildest Dreams book box.

wdboxoctAutumn is finally here…the temperature is slowly creeping down, the trees are shedding amber coloured leaves and Halloween is nearly here.  To honour one of my favourite months of the year, Wildest Dreams book box have given their October box a spooktacular theme- We are Monsters.  So what does this monster edition of the book box contain?  Let’s check it out…

First and foremost, we have this month’s book and it would be an understatement to say I am particularly excited about this one.  The Boneless Mercies by April Genevieve Tucholke sounds like a dark and suspenseful tale:
Frey, Ovie, Juniper, and Runa are Boneless Mercies – death-traders, hired to kill quickly, wdboxoct4quietly and mercifully. It is a job for women, and women only. Men will not do this sad, dark work.
 
Frey has no family, no home, no fortune, and yet her blood sings a song of glory. So when she hears of a monster slaughtering men, women, and children in a northern jarldom, she decides this the Mercies’ one chance to change their fate.  

But glory comes at a price …

wdboxoct3Now that sounds like my kind of Young Adult novel and has been placed high up on my ever growing to be read pile…a perfect October pick.  But along side the books in these boxes, there is always an epic selection of bookish goodies as well and this month is no exception.  Alongside this twisted tale, there is a Vampire Diaries inspired bath bomb courtesy of Pretty Suds.  The bath bomb contains patchouli, vanilla, notes of rose absolute, orange and jasmine and it smells divine!  According to the label, releasing it into my bath will unleash the darkest of souls so I am very excited to see what happens when I plonk it in my bath!  Keep an eye out on my Instagram for a video and picture of the results!

Next, we have another delicious blend of tea by Rosie Lea Teas.  The ‘It’s a Monster’s World tea’ inspired by ‘This Savage Song’ is a caramelised pumpkin tea…yes you read that right.  As I sit watching the trees blow in the wind outside surrounded by flickering candles and the smiling faces of my pumpkins and other Halloween decorations, I literally cannot think of anything more perfect to drink!

But it doesn’t stop there my ghoulish guys and gals…there is also a bloody syringe pen, wdboxoct2perfect for writing down a tale of horror or for simply writing your shopping list (don’t forget the sweets for the trick or treaters) and as a little extra surprise, my very own Halloween tricky treat in the form of a pair of candy eye balls!  They did not last long after I photographed them and they were yummy!  Thanks guys!

Overall, this is by far my favourite box from Wildest Dreams…every item screams Halloween (one of my favourite times of year) and I am super excited for the book.  My rep period with this company will be coming to an end shortly and I am genuinely gutted!  With all honesty, each box has been a wonderful gift to receive through the mail.  If you are looking for a book subscription box, I really recommend this one!  They are well chosen, nicely packaged, great value for money and a joy to open each month!  Thank you for having me guys- you rock!!

Book Review: The Party by Elizabeth Day.

Book Review: The Party by Elizabeth Day.

Hello readers!  For today’s blog post, I will be reviewing The Party by Elizabeth Day, but before we delve into what I thought, lets start with that all important blurb:

the party reviewMartin Gilmour is an outsider. When he wins a scholarship to Burtonbury School, he doesn’t wear the right clothes or speak with the right kind of accent. But then he meets the dazzling, popular and wealthy Ben Fitzmaurice, and gains admission to an exclusive world. Soon Martin is enjoying tennis parties and Easter egg hunts at the Fitzmaurice family’s estate, as Ben becomes the brother he never had.

But Martin has a secret. He knows something about Ben, something he will never tell. It is a secret that will bind the two of them together for the best part of 25 years.

At Ben’s 40th birthday party, the great and the good of British society are gathering to celebrate in a haze of champagne, drugs and glamour. Amid the hundreds of guests – the politicians, the celebrities, the old-money and newly rich – Martin once again feels that disturbing pang of not-quite belonging. His wife, Lucy, has her reservations too. There is disquiet in the air. But Ben wouldn’t do anything to damage their friendship.  Would he?

Told from the perspective of Martin and his wife Lucy, this book moves back and forth through time, between Martin’s Police interview regarding some unknown dramatic incident at the party in question, and the past where we see how Martin’s relationships were formed.  It’s a very suspenseful method of writing, and I found myself eager to read the next chapter and the next, to finally discover exactly what happened at the party and what it will mean for the main characters.  This is definitely a slow burner, but I found it worth the wait.

At its core, this book is about relationships and the importance we put on them.  Martin strategically wedges himself into the life of his ‘best friend’ Ben and his elite family, as a means of bettering himself and his life, importance and status by proxy, but more than that, Martin finds himself drawn both sexually and emotionally to Ben as he struggles to accept his own homosexuality.  Then there is the cold and loveless relationship he shares with his Mother, one which profoundly shapes who Martin is and the absent relationship of his deceased father, unknown but always felt.  Lastly, there is the relationship with his wife Lucy.  To call their courtship romantic would be the biggest overstatement of the century, with both characters essentially settling, seemingly content to simply find someone who respects them and who will be there.  Lucy’s chapters are the most insightful of the book, as unlike Martin, she is capable of a huge amount of emotional intelligence and of seeing things from the perspectives of others.  She brings a level of humanity to Martin which is much needed, because to put it frankly, he comes across as a needy personality vacuum without Lucy’s observations.

It is also a criticism on the class system and of the power and influence that money and titles still hold over society today.  Ben is the epitome of the white, privileged, upper class Eton boys which seem to flood the chambers of Westminster to this day.  He is able to charm and win over anyone, he is liked by all, but at his core he has nothing behind that smile without his family’s wealth to back him up.  The party itself is filled with the typical Notting Hill set of trendy ‘it’ people and influencers, politicians and rich vacuous people whose sense of self entitlement and detachment from the real world is perfectly described by Day throughout- this is satire at its best.  But if you are hoping for a story about those elites getting their come-uppence then I’m afraid you will be reading the wrong book, for the conclusion is clear- money trumps justice every time.

There are a few negatives to this topic and the characters Day has chosen to create.  First of all, none of them are particularly likeable people.  Apart from Lucy (and I found myself irritated with her at points, particularly when she seems to simply shrug and settle in life), every other character is a total tool (I want to use stronger language to be honest).  Martin, the main protagonist, is the worst.  He is so utterly pathetic at points, so desperate to be loved, so desperate to be important and in with the ‘it’ crowd.  He puts so much importance on wealth and status, even buying ridiculously overpriced trainers simply because Ben bought a pair too.  His priorities are completely shot and it results in a character that I felt nothing but dislike and very occasional pity for.

Another issue I had was with the constant negativity of the book.  Martin in particular spends the entire book criticising and hating on other people, particularly at the party itself where there is no end of examples of loathsome people to bitch about.  It can at times make you as a reader feel cynicism taking over, but perhaps that was the point.  This negativity however is interpreted with some fantastic moments of action and these are the moments where Day utterly shines.  There is the event in Ben and Martin’s childhood where Martin took the fall for a fatal car accident, thus solidifying his place in Ben’s life, there is the ‘blow job’ scene at the party where for a moment Martin’s veil shifts and you see the real him and then there is the climax at the party which results in Martin’s interview at the Police station.  Day excels at these moments of action and it is then you see just how talented a writer she really is.

Overall, I found this book an interesting and suspenseful read and I would recommend it to anyone who fancies something thought provoking and writing with a sharp edge…think the Talented Mr Ripley or a modern Great Gatsby.  I would give it four stars out of five and definitely plan on reading more of Day’s work in the future.

Giveaway: Win a ‘My Chronicles Book Box.’

Giveaway: Win a ‘My Chronicles Book Box.’

I have just reached 9000 followers on my Bookstagram account and to celebrate and show my gratitude for each and every one of my wonderful followers, I have joined forces with the incredible ‘My Chronicles Book Box‘ to bring you an exclusive giveaway…head over to my Instagram to find out how to enter!  The prize is amazing and includes THREE books plus a whole bunch of bookish goodies!  The books included are:

diff kind evilA Different Kind of Evil by Andrew Wilson: In January 1927 – and still recovering from the harrowing circumstances surrounding her disappearance a month earlier – Agatha Christie sets sail on an ocean liner bound for the Canary Islands.
She has been sent there by the British Secret Intelligence Service to investigate the death of one of its agents, whose partly mummified body has been found in a cave.
Early one morning, on the passage to Tenerife, Agatha witnesses a woman throw herself from the ship into the sea. At first, nobody connects the murder of the young man on Tenerife with the suicide of a mentally unstable heiress. Yet, soon after she checks into the glamorous Taoro Hotel situated in the lush Orotava Valley, Agatha uncovers a series of dark secrets.
 The famous writer has to use her novelist’s talent for    plotting to outwit an enemy who possesses a very     different kind of evil. 

riviera expressThe Riviera Express by T.P.Fielden: Gerald Hennessey – silver screen star and much-loved heart-throb – never quite makes it to Temple Regis, the quaint Devonshire seaside town on the English Riviera. Murdered on the 4.30 from Paddington, the loss of this great man throws Temple Regis’ community into disarray.  Not least Miss Judy Dimont –corkscrew-haired reporter for the local rag, The Riviera Express. Investigating Gerald’s death, she’s soon called to the scene of a second murder, and, setting off on her trusty moped, Herbert, finds Arthur Shrimsley in an apparent suicide on the clifftops above the town beach.  Miss Dimont must prevail – for why was a man like Gerald coming to Temple Regis anyway? What is the connection between him and Arthur? And just how will she get any answers whilst under the watchful and mocking eyes of her infamously cantankerous Editor, Rudyard Rhys?

broken mirrors coverBroken Mirrors by ME!! Marie McWilliams: When Marie moves from Belfast to London, she envisions a fresh start and an escape from a broken home. Once there, she meets Malcolm Carter, a charming, handsome man who sweeps her off her feet and gives her a life she could only have imagined. But Malcolm isn’t all he seems; he’s a criminal, a mobster and a murderer. Detective Fraser Duncan knows what he is, and he’s determined to take him down, but things get more complex when a rival and brutal gang leader appears on the scene, setting his sights on Malcolm’s empire. When Marie chooses to stay with Malcolm, regardless of what he is and what he has done, she starts down a path from which she can never return, and now she has been taken. Detective Duncan and Malcolm must set their differences aside and join forces in a race against time to save the woman they love.

Along with these three books (A Different kind of evil being a hard back), you will receive lots of surprise bookish goodies!  So head over to my Instagram now and enter!!

Book Review: The Watch House by Bernie McGill.

Book Review: The Watch House by Bernie McGill.

Happy Sunday fellow bookworms.  For this week’s blog post, I will be reviewing The Watch House by Bernie McGill, a fellow Northern Irish writer.  So before we get started on what I thought, let’s find out what the book is about:

watch house review pic‘There are messages in the air, a closeness like the kind that comes before a storm, a listening, a holding of breath.’ It is summer, 1898, on the small Irish island of Rathlin and the place is alive with gossip. A pair of strangers has arrived from the mainland, laden with mysterious radio equipment, and the islanders are full of dread. For native Nuala Byrne, abandoned by her family for the New World and trapped by a prudent marriage to the island’s ageing tailor, the prospects for adventure are bleak. But when she is sent to cook for Marconi’s men and is enlisted, by the Italian engineer Gabriel, as an apprentice operator, she becomes enthralled by the world of knowledge that he brings from beyond her own narrow horizons. As Nuala’s friendship with Gabriel deepens, she realises that her deal with the tailor was a bargain she should never have struck.

The Watch House is a gripping story about the power of words to connect us, and the power of suspicion to drive us apart.

Set on the small and isolated Island of Rathlin, not too far from where I type, the story centres around the  real life use of the Island by the Italian inventor Marconi and his new wireless morse code technology.  The main character, Nuala Byrne, is our guide for the island along with its suspicious and superstitious residents, who finds herself falling for the Italian engineer Gabriel, sent to set the equipment up on the Island.

This wouldn’t normally be the type of book I would pick up…I’m not a huge historical fiction fan, nor am I big into romance, but I’m very glad I did.  Bernie is an incredible writer.  She is a word smith, a poet who has such an artful way with language, giving every sentence an almost lyrical quality.  There wasn’t a chapter without some beautiful or profound quote you would happily have embroidered on a pillow.  She is the type of writer which makes me very jealous due to her uncanny ability with the written word.

The book is incredibly well researched, with every historical detail accurately depicted and every square inch of the island and its caves brought to life.   I found myself genuinely interested in the Italian inventor Marconi and his Morse code technology to the point that I lost an hour googling him online.  It even made me want to visit Rathin island, somewhere which despite its closeness, I have never had reason to visit.  It is obvious to the reader, the time and effort Bernie put into writing this book and it is very much appreciated.

The characters themselves are incredibly real and believable.  From the curious, adventure seeking Nuala to her vile, spinster sister in law Ginny, I found myself genuinely engrossed in their lives and individual stories.  I enjoyed the switching of perspectives between these narrators, to see the world through their eyes and from their own perspectives- it really helps the reader connect with Nuala and to root for her happiness, no matter how futile our hopes for a happy ending appear.

The central themes of this book are well explored and carry as much importance and relevance now as they did a century ago.  The theme of communication is explored deeply in the book and is just as relevant today in our world of ever evolving communication technology.  The clash between the old and the new, the struggles of some to come to terms with sudden modernity is something else which we still see today, as many struggle to keep up with this constant evolution.  Indeed, even the idea of the corruption and interception of communication is explored, with devastating consequences for the lead character.  Whilst this book involves wireless morse code rather than the super computer I call my smart phone, the implications of messages being intercepted and corrupted, the power of communication and the benefits it can bring, reaches across time and raises the same questions and issues now as it did then.

Whilst I had some issues with the ending and the decisions made by certain characters, albeit with the best of intentions, I recommend this book to any fan of historical fiction.  I would give it four stars out of five!

 

 

 

Giveaway: Fancy winning a signed book & some bookish goodies?

Giveaway: Fancy winning a signed book & some bookish goodies?

Hello readers! I wanted to take a moment to say thank you to all of you.  Thank you for reading my stories, for following my Instagram page and subscribing to this blog.  Thank you for the kind comments, the likes, the book recommendations and most importantly, thank you for your friendship!  Because I have genuinely made some wonderful friends through this kind, nerdy, book loving community.  To show my gratitude, I am doing two things…first of all, for the next FIVE days, my crime fiction novel Broken Mirrors will be FREE on kindle.  Head over to Amazon now and grab your copy!  But not only is my book free, by downloading a copy, you have a chance of winning lots of bookish goodies along with a signed hard copy of the book.  Entering is simple- just send your proof of purchase/download of my free kindle edition to mariemcwilliamsblog@outlook.com and you will be entered into the giveaway.  So what could you win?

giveaway2

The prize includes:

  • “We are all in the gutter but some of us are looking at the stars” Oscar Wilde Quote print by The Literary Emporium.
  • Book Lovers badge set by The Literary Emporium featuring FOUR bookish badges: I like big books and I cannot lie, Well read, Readers gonna read and Fight evil, read books.
  • Frankenstein quote bookmark by Literary Emporium: “You will rejoice to hear that no disaster has accompanied the commencement of an enterprise which you have regarded with such evil forebodings.”
  • Library Card notepad by The Literary Emporium.
  • Strange the Dreamer quote necklace by Fan Girl Pixie Jar: “Dream up something wild and improbable.”
  • Amortentia tea by Riddle’s Tea Shoppe.
  • Skull and Crossbones silicone tea strainer.
  • Signed hard copy of Broken Mirrors.
  • ‘I like big books and I cannot lie’ shopper.

So if you fancy a FREE crime thriller and would like the chance to win all of these goodies, head to Amazon and download your free kindle copy now! Terms and conditions below!

Broken Mirrors: When Marie moves from Belfast to London, she envisions a fresh start and an escape from a broken home. Once there, she meets Malcolm Carter, a charming, handsome man who sweeps her off her feet and gives her a life she could only have imagined. But Malcolm isn’t all he seems; he’s a criminal, a mobster and a murderer. Detective Fraser Duncan knows what he is, and he’s determined to take him down, but things get more complex when a rival and brutal gang leader appears on the scene, setting his sights on Malcolm’s empire. When Marie chooses to stay with Malcolm, regardless of what he is and what he has done, she starts down a path from which she can never return, and now she has been taken. Detective Duncan and Malcolm must set their differences aside and join forces in a race against time to save the woman they love.

giveaway

Terms and Conditions:

  1. You must be over 18 to enter this giveaway or have your parents permission.
  2. This giveaway if open internationally.
  3. To enter you must email proof of download/purchase of the free kindle copy of Broken Mirrors by Marie McWilliams to mariemcwilliamsblog@outlook.com.
  4. Only kindle downloads/purchases between 18th September 2018 midnight (pacific standard time) and 21st September 2018 midnight (pacific standard time) are valid for giveaway entry- sorry!  But you can enter as many times as you like, so get your friends/mum/boyfriend/wife/dog to download it too and send me a screen shot of proof of down load by them for additional entries.
  5. A winner will be chosen at random after 21st of September 2018 and will be contacted by Email.  If that winner fails to respond within five days, a new winner will be randomly drawn.

 

 

Wildest Dreams Book subscription box: Unboxing & Review.

Wildest Dreams Book subscription box: Unboxing & Review.

I received some wonderful book mail this weekend…this month’s Wildest Dreams book subscription box, the theme of which is ‘Survival September.’  This box is inspired by those nail biting Young adult stories of survival and the characters fighting their way through them.  In this post, I will show you what the box contains and review each item. Let me know your favourite stories of survival in the comments and remember, if you like the box as much as me, you can use my discount code MARIE15 for 15 %.

First up, this month’s Young Adult book is That’s not what happened by Kody Keplinger.  So what’s it about?

It’s been three years since the Virgil County High School Massacre. Three years since my best friend, Sarah, was killed in a bathroom stall during the mass shooting. Everyone knows Sarah’s story–that she died proclaiming her faith.   But it’s not true.
I know because I was with her when she died. I didn’t say anything then, and people got hurt because of it. Now Sarah’s parents are publishing a book about her, so this might be my last chance to set the record straight . . . but I’m not the only survivor with a story to tell about what did–and didn’t–happen that day.
Except Sarah’s martyrdom is important to a lot of people, people who don’t take kindly to what I’m trying to do. And the more I learn, the less certain I am about what’s right. I don’t know what will be worse: the guilt of staying silent or the consequences of speaking up . 

wildbox2I haven’t read anything by this author yet, but I am familiar with her work having watched (and thoroughly enjoyed) the big screen adaptation of her debut novel The Duff. It’s the perfect choice for this month’s box and sits perfectly within its theme.  The story sounds interesting and a little edgier that her other work and I am genuinely excited to read it.  Keep an eye out on my blog for a review once I’ve sank my teeth into it.

Now for the bookish items within the box.  Along with the novel, there is a ‘Caravel’ inspired whipped cream wash by Shimmer and Luxe.  It is called ‘Exquisite nightmares and stolen dreams’ and smells like sugared almonds.  I have to say, this genuinely looks and smells good enough to eat and having tested a little bit on my hands, I am super excited to lather up when I’m next in the bath…it left my hand feeling super soft and smelling like candy!  Also, that colour is just divine, rightwildbox3

Next, there is Hunger games inspired tea by Rosie Lea Tea, which is rhubarb flavoured Japanese green tea.  I am a huge Green tea drinker, and I just love rhubarb so I am particularly excited to sample this.  I had the pleasure of tasting Rosie Lea tea from last month’s box and I can say their teas are just delicious!  There are even some tea bags in case you prefer that method over a tea strainer, which is a detail I really appreciate.
Processed with VSCO with m5 presetLastly, there is the cutest book mark featuring the most awesome Sarah J.Maas quote ever from Throne of Glass: “I can survive well enough on my own- if given the proper reading material.”  Never a Truer word spoken.

The Wildest dreams boxes never let me down and as always, I am excited to read the book and I love the goodies inside!  Now, for a relaxing bubble bath with my whipped body wash…

Book Review: Into the Water by Paula Hawkins.

Book Review: Into the Water by Paula Hawkins.

Happy Sunday fellow book worms…for this post I will be reviewing Into the Water, the eagerly anticipated second novel by bestseller Paula Hawkins, author of The Girl on the Train.  Before we delve into my thoughts on the book, let’s take a look at that trusty blurb to find out what it’s about:

Just days before her sister plunged to her death, Jules ignored her call.

Now Nel is dead. They say she jumped. And Jules must return to her sister’s house to care for her daughter, and to face the mystery of Nel’s death.

But Jules is afraid. Of her long-buried memories, of the old Mill House, of this small town that is drowning in secrecy . . .

And of knowing that Nel would never have jumped.

This book centres around a small English town called Beckford, through which there runs a river, affectionately known as ‘The Drowning Pool,’ where “troublesome women” are drowned.  Many women seem to have lost their lives to its waters.  There were young women accused of being witches drowned there, women who committed suicide there and, as the blurb suggests, women who were murdered there.  The drowning which is at the heart of the book is that of Nel Abbott, a local woman who happened to be writing a book about the drowning pool and the many women who met their end there, much to the chagrin of the local residents who would prefer to leave the past in the past.  Nel’s teenage daughter Lena believes her mother committed suicide, but her estranged sister Jules is convinced it was murder, but which one is correct?

My first and biggest problem with this book is the sheer amount of narrators.  There are ELEVEN narrators (yes you read that right) all of which give their own perspectives and theories on Nel’s death as well as the various other secrets which come to light throughout the book- It is beyond confusing.  Each one throws out their own reliable accounts and red herrings into the mix and worse still, none of these narrators have different enough voices to truly set them apart from one another, and after a while, they all blend into one another.  At points, I found myself flicking back to previous chapters to clarify who was who and who did or said what.  As a result, storylines are rushed and characters left undeveloped and any suspense or mystery is lost.  Whilst I admire Hawkins’ ambition, sadly the whole thing fails to come together and makes for one confusing read.

My second problem is with the characters themselves and the fact that they are all wholly unpleasant.  I did not empathise or connect with any of them and as a result, when they revealed some tragic or traumatic incident from their past, I read it the way I would read their lunch order- with complete disinterest and detachment.  There are also parts of the book which feel clumsy, with important plot points and pieces of evidence sandwiched into chapters which might as well have read, “remember this, this is important to Nel’s murder.” Then there is the killer, whose identity is blatantly obvious from the second you are introduced, despite the dozens of red herrings presented by all of our unreliable narrators.  I have never read an author go to such pains to point out what a “good guy” someone was before.  There might as well have been a neon sign above their head reading “Killer here.”

But there are positives to this book.  I thoroughly enjoyed the excerpts from Nel Abbott’s own book and the glimpses into the witch trials, peppered with hints at the paranormal, I just wish this had been explored more.  There are also a number of interesting subjects touched upon within the book: the unreliability of our own memories, familial relationships, feminism and patriarchy, but because there are so many things going on, so many secrets revealed and narrator’s stories to follow, none of these topics are fully developed or explored.  It is also obvious from reading this book that Paula Hawkins is a good writer, with some beautiful imagery and descriptions which set scenes beautifully and left clear images in your mind.  Whilst I wasn’t a huge fan of this book, I have bought The Girl on the Train, so she has obviously left an impression.

Overall, it’s not a bad book, it’s just not a great book either.  I admire the author’s ambition, but think the whole thing falls rather flat and makes for a confusing and forgettable read.  I have no doubt however, given the huge success of Paula Hawkins and her debut novel The Girl on the Train, that this book will sell millions of copies, and it will find many fans.  I would give it 3 stars out of 5.

Have you read this book?  What did you think?  Leave me a comment and let me know.  Don’t forget to subscribe to my blog to keep up to date on all my latest posts.